Bristol Fighter




Bristol Fighter

 

Specifications

Primary Function:
Crew:
Engines:
Power:
Weight Empty:
Max. Weight:
Machine Guns:
Length:
Wingspan:
Cruise Speed:
Max. Speed:
Initial Climb:
Ceiling:
Range:
First Flight:
Year Deployed:
fighter/observer
two
RR Falcon III
275 hp
2,150 lbs.
3,250 lbs.
2- 7.7 mm
25 ft. 10 in.
39 ft. 3 in.
110 mph
125 mph
900 fpm
18,000 feet
370 miles
9/9/1916
1917



 

Bristol Fighter

Bristol Fighter

The British Bristol fighter, officially designated Bristol F.2, was manned by a pilot and a gunner/observer. The pilot could engage enemy aircraft by firing a fixed machine gun that was synchronized through the propeller arc. The gunner/observer had a pivoting machine gun mounted mid-ship that could be used to protect the rear of the aircraft.

When the Bristol Fighter was initially deployed, pilots did not use the forward firing gun to its full potential. They engaged enemy aircraft by bringing the mid-ship machine gun to bare, losing their surprise and maneuvering advantages. A number of aircraft were lost in such engagements, until pilots starting using the forward firing machine gun to its full potential. It was then that the maneuverability, speed, diving abilities, and overall ruggedness of the Bristol Fighter overcame the German Fokker D.VII threat.

The Bristol Fighter went on to become the primary fighter aircraft of the newly formed British Royal Air Force on April 1, 1918.

After the war, the aircraft remained in production. The last Bristol Fighter was delivered to the Royal Air Force in of December 1926.

Many air forces around the world operated the Bristol Fighter. It continued in use through 1941 as a troop support, ground attack aircraft and as a training aircraft.

A total of 5,329 Bristol Fighter aircraft were produced. Three restored aircraft continue to fly to date.

RC Bristol Fighter

RC Bristol Fighter

Pictured above is the RC Bristol Fighter  built by Dennis Ferrari from a kit for sale by Flair Models Ltd. It has a wingspan of 76 in. Power can come from .60 to .80 two cycle or .70 to .90 four cycle engines. Upon completion all up weight should be between 8 1/2 and 10 lbs.

The RC Bristol Fighter kit from Macca's Vintage Aerodrome builds to a wingspan of 94 in. Fuselage length is 62 in. overall. For power you will need 10 to 15 cc two cycle or 15 to 20 cc four cycle engines. All up weight is around 18 lbs.

3 Sea Bees has a RC Bristol Fighter kit. It builds to a wingspan of 94 in. and a length of 63 in. Recommended to power it are from .60 to .90 two cycle and from .90 to 1.20 four cycle engines. Upon completion it should weigh about 16 lbs.

There is a RC Bristol Fighter kit from K&W Model Airplanes. It has a wingspan of 94 in. and a length of 62 1/2 in.  K&W recommends .60 to .90 two stroke and .90 to 1.20 four stroke engines.

Cleveland Model has RC Bristol Fighter plans designed by Frank Barnwell that range from wingspans of 14 1/2 to 115 3/4 inches.




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