C-119 Flying Boxcar




YouTube - C-119 Flying Boxcar

Specifications

Primary Function:
Crew:
Seats:
Engine:
Power:
Length:
Wingspan:
Weight Empty:
Max. Weight:
Cargo:
Cruise Speed:
Max. Speed:
Initial Climb:
Ceiling:
Range:
First Flight:
Year Deployed:
transport
five
62 troops
P&W R-4360-20
2 x 3,500 hp. ea.
86' 6"
109' 3"
40,000 lbs.
70,000 lbs.
10,000 lbs.
200 mph
295 mph
1,100 fpm
24,000 feet
2,280 miles
11/17/47
1949
 



C-119 Flying Boxcar

C-119 Flying Boxcar

The C-119 Flying Boxcar built by Fairchild, was designed as an improvement over earlier Fairchild transport aircraft. It can accommodate bigger and heavier cargo payloads in a larger, reinforced fuselage. Part of the additional room is a result of the flight deck of the aircraft being redesigned to fit in the very front of the fuselage. Maximum loaded weight went from 42,000 lbs. to 64,000 lbs. while new engines deliver almost 70% more power.

The airplane first took to the sky in 1947 and continued in military service through 1974. Many were in civilian service for years, and a few continue to fly today. Its versatility is well regarded. Among other things, is has been employed as a cargo hauler, paratroop and passenger transport, air ambulance, and an airborne gunship.

The C-119 Flying Boxcar is strong enough to operate out of short, unimproved landing areas, and carry large, heavy payloads. The aircraft proved extremely reliable and ground crews appreciate that its upkeep is easy. The one word most heard to sum up the C-119 experience is "dependable".

During the Korean War, the C-119 Flying Boxcar served with distinction as a cargo and troop transport. It continued to serve on after the war throughout most of the world. The airplane even took part in early space capsule recovery programs.

In Vietnam, the airplane was flown by the CIA in support of French operations. It was also used in support of India during the Sino-Indian War. The C-119 was also exported for use by nations throughout the world.

On December 16 and 17, 1964 a blizzard from Canada dropped heavy snow, closing roads and isolating ranchers and livestock in southeastern Montana. Operation Hay Lift involved nine C-119 Flying Boxcar aircraft dropping feed and hay directly over starving animals, typically from an altitude of 50 feet at a speed of around 150 mph. Each aircraft carried about five tons of goods per flight. They have been credited with saving the lives of thousands of animals.

After being retired from military service, a number of C-119 Flying Boxcar aircraft were sold for use throughout the United States as air tankers. They were fitted with water and retardant tanks in their bellies.

A total of 1,183 C-119 Flying Boxcar airplanes were produced.

C-119 - Carl Bachhuber

RC C-119 Flying Boxcar

Carl Bachhuber built the good looking RC C-119 Flying Boxcar pictured above from Palmer Plans, enlarged to a wingspan of 14 3/4 feet. It is powered by GT80 engines.




3 thoughts on “C-119 Flying Boxcar”

  1. admin says:

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  2. Gary Warren says:

    I flew in this plane when I was in the air force at Luke AFB in Arizona. We fed the native Americans who were snowed in. It was the winter of 1968 I think. I think it made history as being one of the biggest air lift operations in the U.S.

  3. Marv says:

    The C119 was the first airplane that I jumped out of at Fort Benning 1972 and it also was the first airplane I ever flew in.

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