Piper Cub




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8oWTLFGmH8

YouTube - Piper Cub

Specifications

Primary Function:
Crew:
Engine:
Horsepower:
Length:
Wingspan:
Weight Empty:
Max. Weight:
Passengers:
Payload:
Fuel Capacity:
Fuel Used:
Cruise Speed:
Max. Speed:
Climb Rate:
Ceiling:
Range:
First Flight:
Year Deployed:
trainer, recreation
one pilot
Continental A-65-8
65 hp flat 4
22 ft. 5 in.
35 ft. 3 in.
680 lbs.
1,220 lbs.
one
455 lbs.
12 gallons
4 - 5 gph
75 mph
87 mph
450 fpm
11,500 feet
220 miles
2/14/38
1938




Piper Cub

Piper Cub

The Piper Cub, officially Piper J-3 Cub, is one of the most recognized airplanes in the world. The aircraft became the mainstay trainer of civilian pilots, preparing them to enter Air Corps service prior to World War II.

As a trainer, the Piper Cub is simple in design. It has an extensive wing area that somewhat helps to help make up for the lack of power of its engine. It is also a sturdy aircraft, and simple to fix. These ingredients made the aircraft able to survive the type of abuse it endures while under the control of novice pilots.

In 1941 a military version of Piper Cub was developed, primarily as an observation plane, designated the L-4 Grasshopper. It was virtually identical mechanically to the Piper Cub. It was also used as a utility and observation aircraft during the war. Some were put to service in the Korean War as well.

Landing the Piper Cub in a cross wind can get interesting. The light aircraft can be blown side ways fairly easily. Being ready to apply some rudder and throttle while landing is a good idea. And, if it gets going too far sideways, it is always prudent to go around for another try.

Given its low wing loading, stalling the aircraft is usually done purposefully. Spins are performed in slow motion. If you do force the aircraft into a stall or spin, and have sufficient altitude, just centering the controls and applying a little forward stick to pick up flying speed will get you back in control.

Given its low wing loading, stalling the aircraft is usually done purposefully. Spins are performed in slow motion. If you do force the aircraft into a stall or spin, and have sufficient altitude, just centering the controls and applying a little forward stick to pick up flying speed will get you back in control.

Flying the Piper Cub is a pleasure, especially if you leave the doors and windows open on a spring day, and like to fly low and slow. Flying solo does have its challenges. You must occupy the rear seat in order to offset the weight of the fuel in its tank up front. That means that the nose of the aircraft can interfere with your forward view on take off and landings.

The trick to achieving better over the nose visibility during take off is, after the tail comes up, to keep just enough forward stick to keep the nose down until sufficient speed is reached to rotate. Before the tail comes up, the best view is out of the side window. Also, pilots used to flying other, more modern, single engine civil aircraft, will find that a bit of anticipated extra rudder will help coordinate turns and prevent side slip.

If you have a fondness for slow fliers from the earlier days of civil aviation, the Piper Cub will not disappoint. With its exposed cylinders, wing bracing, and tandem cockpit design, it exudes an aura of quaintness that has been misplaced among most of today's more utilitarian aircraft.

Some 20,000 Piper Cub aircraft were built from 1938 to 1947.  It is estimated that thousands still fly today.

Piper-Cub-HobbyKing

Piper Cub

The Piper Cub pictured right above from HobbyKing in U.S. Navy colors has a 55 in. wingspan and 37 1/2 in. length. Included is a 3648 - 700 kV motor.

The Piper Cub from The World Models is an ARF that has a wingspan of 48 1/2 in. with a length of 30 1/2 in.  Included is a Speed 400 motor.  Weight is about 26 oz.

The Piper Cub by Hangar 9 has an 80 in. wingspan and a 51 in. length. Construction is wood throughout. Engines should be from .36 to .46 two cycle or .56 to .82 four cycle. Weight is around 7 lbs.